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  1. #1

    Recommended tools

    Hi just a thought, but does anybody know whether there are specific tool brands that official casio repairers use to remove screws and pins? or are there official casio tools available for the job?

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  3. #2
    Not something I've come across but something I'd be interested to hear about. Had a quick look on pacparts and couldn't find anything. Always used generic tools too...
    G-Shock Spares Wanted

    The Collection:GW-200Z Frogman, G-300LV-7AJF, Giez GS-300C-1B, G-2500, DW-5025B-7ER, DW-5200C-1, DW-5300-G9V, G-5500MC-8JF, G-5500R-1DR, DW-5600C-1, GW-M5600-1JF, Tokyo Design Project x DW-5750BR, DW-5900C-9, DW-6000GJ-1, DW-6100J-1, DW-6100CF-3JF Addict, DW-6500GJ-1B Skyforce, DW-6600, DW-8400G-1 Mudman, G-9100R-4 G-Rescue Gulfman, GW-9200-1ER Riseman, GW-9300-1DR Mudman, DW-9350MSJ-2T Raysman, DW-9700NK Gulfman

  4. #3
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    i would think that they use higher grade tools..with magnetized tips as to not drop screws..i do know that they have special tools to remove bands and resize them but theres not a lot of real watchmakers left anymore and im pretty sure the ones that are left arent really making g shocks..probably more like rolex watches

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    Not sure about the magnetised screwdrivers, not the best tool to use around electronics. The other thing that we should consider is ESD - Electrostatic Discharge - you can quite easily kill an electronic circuit or chip with the static electricity generated by your body, good idea to earth yourself and the watch or module to the same point. Stores like Maplins (UK) or Radio Shack (US) can sell you ESD mats with a wrist strap that connects by curly cord so that anything on the mat is same potential as yourself.

    When I worked in advertising photography and we were photographing carpets we had to earth ourselves before accepting a cup of coffee as the potential built up walking on the artificial fibre was enough to cause a shock between the coffee donor and acceptee with hilarious coffee stain on carpet consequences.

    We earthed ourselves on a metal pillar of the studio - slowly offering the knuckle of a finger toward it. You could get a spark of about an inch - 2.5cm to you youngsters out there You can easily charge yourself to around 40,000 volts which is enough to cause problems with chips and ICs.
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  6. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    nyc
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    Quote Originally Posted by macspite View Post
    Not sure about the magnetised screwdrivers, not the best tool to use around electronics. The other thing that we should consider is ESD - Electrostatic Discharge - you can quite easily kill an electronic circuit or chip with the static electricity generated by your body, good idea to earth yourself and the watch or module to the same point. Stores like Maplins (UK) or Radio Shack (US) can sell you ESD mats with a wrist strap that connects by curly cord so that anything on the mat is same potential as yourself.

    When I worked in advertising photography and we were photographing carpets we had to earth ourselves before accepting a cup of coffee as the potential built up walking on the artificial fibre was enough to cause a shock between the coffee donor and acceptee with hilarious coffee stain on carpet consequences.

    We earthed ourselves on a metal pillar of the studio - slowly offering the knuckle of a finger toward it. You could get a spark of about an inch - 2.5cm to you youngsters out there You can easily charge yourself to around 40,000 volts which is enough to cause problems with chips and ICs.
    good that you said that...ive been wanting to get a set of small screwdrivers that were magnetized to hold the screw on...never thought i would hurt the watch...ive used a small magnet flathead to remove a fake watches modules...probably to small to kill it?
    So your saying the manetics may kill the module??

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    I am not saying that magnetics or static discharge will kill a module but I am saying that they may kill it. A bit like smoking 30 cigarettes a day won't necessarily give you lung cancer but there is a fair risk involved.

    I use a large tupperware container (other brands of self sealing plastic food containers are available) or a washing up bowl to work in when disassembling a watch. When I inevitably drop a screw it stays within the container or bowl and is easily seen. I also have a set of jewellers loupes - eyeglasses if you will - that clip onto my reading specs. If your eyesight is good enough to not need glasses then you can use the loupes that you hold in place like a monocle or the clip on ones on a cheap pair of lightly tinted shades.
    BLATANT ADVERT: Come to the best military show on the south coast - June 1st to 4th 2012 - 300+ authentic military vehicles, dedicated living history field, arena events including battle re-enactments daily, 100 traders, food court and beer tent. Free parking and a chance to meet me! PM or http://www.solentoverlord.co.uk/blog for details

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    nyc
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    thanks for the tips, i took a watch apart a few weeks ago and was going crazy trying to find the screw or "screws" i dropped..they are a lot smaller than i thought...my vision is bad so now i have a reason to actually use the loupe i have. dont have the guts yet to take apart a real gshock so ive been practicing on crappy fakes and other watches i have again thanks for the tips!!!

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