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  1. #1

    Stuck in buttons on DW-5600E

    I recently picked up a G-shock DW-5600E for my first g-shock. I've always been a watch guy but never had many digital watches so I am learning as I go. The new watch is great with the exception of one thing, the adjust button is recessed further into the bezel than can be easily reached without the use of a finger nail or pen tip.

    I've always been a diy guy and I was wondering if the problem could be corrected by pulling the module/chip/action out of the case then carefully replacing it after setting the buttons to their proper position.

    If anyone has tried this any pointers/warnings would be appreciated.

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  3. #2
    The adjust button is slightly recessed by design. Of course it is also possible the module and/or button aren't aligned correctly. Easy enough to check, remove the four screws and caseback and the module will be revealed. Suggest you use something like a cocktail stick to make any adjustments, you really don't want to touch inside the case. When reassembling good form to use silicone grease on the seal

  4. #3
    Although a somewhat differet model this gives an idea of what you might expect to see > http://www.g-shockzone.com/showthrea...00-restoration

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    South coast of UK
    Posts
    887
    Granny and eggs time:

    The silicone grease is important for lubricating the rubber seal to keep it flexible and to ensure waterproofing, Can be obtained in a tube from any good motor factors or car spares shop for about three quid. Squeeze a tiny amount, smaller than a pea into the palm of one hand, spread with a finger tip of the other hand and use that fingertip to lightly and gently smear the seal. If the seal has come away from the watch back then place on a clean surface and lubricate both sides being careful not to pull on it too hard.

    It is worth while investing in a decent screwdriver, a Phillips #000. Can be bought on its own or as part of a set from eBay.

    I tend to operate on my long-suffering watches in a large tupperware box (lid off obviously!) so that screws dropped remain inside the box and are easily seen.

    There is a tiny spring that makes contact between the module and the case back to generate the alarm noise(s). Keeping the watch face down helps prevent losing the spring.

    Apologies if this is stating the blindly obvious to you, these are lessons I have learnt through my own clumsy efforts

  6. #5
    Thanks for the advice everyone. I hadn't thought of working on a watch in a container, but that is a brilliant idea.

    I would be content to just leave the watch as it is but I am concerned that the button being recessed might compromise the seal of the watch. I work in fairly nasty environments with lots of automotive and industrial fluids and I want the watch to hold up to the conditions (hence getting a G-shock).

  7. #6
    Container is a good idea actually.

    Might be worth getting the watch pressure tested after you've checked the button out to ensure integrity of the seal if that's something you're concerned about

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Somewhere
    Posts
    82
    Another thumbs up for the container idea.... the amount of times I've had screws and springs go flying and no doubt eaten by the hoover later....

  9. #8
    I guess my main dilemma is, would it be worth it to attempt to fix the button or would it be best for the integrity of the watch to leave it alone? And would the button being recessed already be causing the seal to be compromised?

    Regardless, I will probably grab a second G-Shock sometime in the near future to have as a backup and a casual watch to wear when I am not covered in grease, oil, and hydraulic fluids.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    South coast of UK
    Posts
    887
    Difficult to tell if the button is too far recessed without seeing a picture. I assume that the button functions as expected? Would have thought that the watch would still be fine for avoiding fluid damage at surface pressure, not certain about at 200m depth equivalent. Opinion is divided about operating buttons when diving.

    Good plan to acquire a second watch, mirrors my own experience - bought a nice and,to me, very expensive G-Shock and realised that a lot of the time it would be exposed to all kinds of drilling dust, metal shards, mud and general abuse. So bought a cheap solar atomic off eBay to act as a daily driver. Then found I could repair my old DW-6600 that had been lying unloved for ages.

    Now have 30+ G-Shocks ...

  11. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by macspite View Post
    Difficult to tell if the button is too far recessed without seeing a picture. I assume that the button functions as expected? Would have thought that the watch would still be fine for avoiding fluid damage at surface pressure, not certain about at 200m depth equivalent. Opinion is divided about operating buttons when diving.
    Sound advice.

    I'd not worry too much about integrity following any repair, you could always get a pressure test if you're worried. From memory the button seal sits inside the case so the amount the button is depressed won't affect the seal. Assume it is recommended not to push the button whilst at pressure because it is probably a good idea not to disturb the seal in any way. However many have indeed pushed buttons whilst diving without issue.

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